Training Packs


Learning about FGM

These training packs are aimed at various audiences - communities, teachers, health professionals, faith leaders, and girls themselves. They are developed by different agencies and are linked here for your use, with the according copyright information in each:

Facilitating Generation Dialogues with Men on FGM

Facilitating Generation Dialogues with Men on FGM

Published by GIZ

This manual unpacks how to facilitate Generation Dialogues about FGM with men.

The Generation Dialogue approach was rst developed in Guinea, West Africa. In 2001, a group of community-based organisations (CBOs) decided to look for a new way to reduce the widespread practice of female genital cut- ting. In spite of many years of information and health education campaigns throughout Guinea, the cutting continued. Knowing about its harmful consequences did not stop families from submitting their daughters to it.

The CBOs decided to change direction: If so many Guineans felt that it was right to have their daughters cut, they must have had strong reasons for it. To nd out about these reasons, the CBOs would have to create an atmosphere of trust and respect so that Guineans – both the older and younger generations – would be prepared to discuss what they really thought about cutting.

The rst Generation Dialogue that the CBOs organised in 2002 was based on three principles: active listening, dialogue and respect – respect as much for the different points of view as for the local culture and traditions. While the approach has since been adapted to different contexts and requirements, it has always maintained these principles and followed a common set of steps.

Since then, Generation Dialogue projects have been carried out in Kenya, Mali, Mauritania, Namibia, Sierra Leone and Yemen. In each country, they have been successfully adapted to local conditions and cultures. And in each place, the Dialogues have helped encourage new community initiatives, ranging from literacy classes for women in the Yemen, to peer educator training in life skills for uncut girls in Guinea.

Overall, the aim of the Generation Dialogue process is to build a group of ‘Dialogue Champions’ at the heart of a community. These groups will carry the dialogue between the generations not just into a large number of families, but also into schools, health centres, mosques and churches, and local government.

Also see their very helpful material on training Generation Dialogue facilitators.

More on this resource here

Download the PDF here

Facilitating Generation Dialogues with Women on FGM

Facilitating Generation Dialogues with Women on FGM

Published by GIZ

This manual unpacks how to facilitate Generation Dialogues about FGM with women.

The Generation Dialogue approach was rst developed in Guinea, West Africa. In 2001, a group of community-based organisations (CBOs) decided to look for a new way to reduce the widespread practice of female genital cut- ting. In spite of many years of information and health education campaigns throughout Guinea, the cutting continued. Knowing about its harmful consequences did not stop families from submitting their daughters to it.

The CBOs decided to change direction: If so many Guineans felt that it was right to have their daughters cut, they must have had strong reasons for it. To nd out about these reasons, the CBOs would have to create an atmosphere of trust and respect so that Guineans – both the older and younger generations – would be prepared to discuss what they really thought about cutting.

The rst Generation Dialogue that the CBOs organised in 2002 was based on three principles: active listening, dialogue and respect – respect as much for the different points of view as for the local culture and traditions. While the approach has since been adapted to different contexts and requirements, it has always maintained these principles and followed a common set of steps.

Since then, Generation Dialogue projects have been carried out in Kenya, Mali, Mauritania, Namibia, Sierra Leone and Yemen. In each country, they have been successfully adapted to local conditions and cultures. And in each place, the Dialogues have helped encourage new community initiatives, ranging from literacy classes for women in the Yemen, to peer educator training in life skills for uncut girls in Guinea.

Overall, the aim of the Generation Dialogue process is to build a group of ‘Dialogue Champions’ at the heart of a community. These groups will carry the dialogue between the generations not just into a large number of families, but also into schools, health centres, mosques and churches, and local government.

Also see their very helpful material on training Generation Dialogue facilitators.

More on this resource here

Download the PDF here

FGM risk and safeguarding: guidance for professionals

FGM risk and safeguarding: guidance for professionals

Published by UK Department of Health

This training manual is for healthcare professionals and all other professionals involved in child protection and responsible for ensuring healthcare services have appropriate safeguarding arrangements. It was specifically written for British National Health Services (NHS), however much of the content is applicable in other contexts.

More on this resource here

Download the PDF here

FGM Training Pack for African Diaspora Communities: Teachers Guide

FGM Training Pack for African Diaspora Communities: Teachers Guide

Published by 28 Too Many

This pack contains two lesson plans, of approximately 50 minutes each. It could also be used in smaller bite size sessions as each lesson is clearly divided into a few sections.

For these lessons you will need:

  The accompanying PowerPoint slides

  The linked video

  The Trainers Guide

Target audience

This resource is designed for use in secondary schools but could also be used in youth and community groups. The material is aimed at students, specifically those between the ages of 12 and 14. The primary aim of this resource is to education girls on FGM and its risks. A number of African communities cut girls around the age of 15, as part of a coming of age ceremony. Other African communities perform FGM at a much younger age (0 – 5 years). Of course many more don’t perform FGM at all. This pack is primarily aimed at at-risk girls from the African diaspora. Please assess your class before using this resource. Explore our website for country specific information that can help you determine how appropriate this resource would be for your school.

FGM is a difficult topic

The resource is designed to need minimum lesson planning but the teacher still needs to be familiar with the materials so they can decide if there are sections they should miss out. We have not suggested an age group beyond secondary school – each teacher will know what is appropriate for their students. We would recommend generally to teach mixed sex groups but in some schools this may not be appropriate. What is important is that the boys learn about FGM as well. There are opportunities to link in with topics such as peer pressure and the power of culture in a more general way. There are also links to subjects such as fundraising and political activism. There is time to revise basic female anatomy, a subject that can always benefit from revision. We have also included a sample letter to parents to introduce the training to them.

The resource uses different ways of teaching and learning

There are lots of opportunities for discussion and feedback. We suggest you vary these slots from discussion in pairs with feedback to whole class discussion. There are some work sheets to do in small groups. There is also a link to a short video clip.

Download the PDF here

Global Agreements, Grassroots Advocacy

Global Agreements, Grassroots Advocacy

Published by British Youth Council, Plan International, ActionAid and Restless Development

The world now has the largest generation aged 15-24 in history, making up a quarter of the world’s population. Almost 90% of this age group live in developing countries yet just one in three countries consult young people with regards to plans for tackling poverty and development (Partners for Change 2014 Report, page 2). The time for change is now. Read this toolkit to find out how you can make a difference to ensure the voices of young people are heard in the corridors of power across the world. Jointly published by Restless Development, Action Aid and Plan.

This toolkit is for you if you are:

  • a young person or member of a youth organisation.
  • passionate about having an honest and responsive government.
  • of the belief that young people must be fairly represented and involved in making the decisions that affect them.
  • keen to raise awareness of important issues in your local and national government, and connect with other young people promoting the same causes.

More on this resource here

Download the PDF here

Implementing Change: A Training Manual for Facilitators

Implementing Change: A Training Manual for Facilitators

Published by Terre des Femmes

This manual, developed within the EU co-funded projects CHANGE and CHANGE Plus (2013–2018), is based on the experience of its partner organisations and draws on materials developed within the project duration. It includes experiences, lessons learned and best practices from trainings for CHANGE Agents and the findings from their community interventions. It aims to enable you to conduct trainings for multipliers promoting behaviour change towards the abandonment of FGM in communities across the European Union.

It is designed as a good practice guide that presents information in an application-oriented way. Throughout the handbook you will find case studies and examples as well as references and, in the concluding section, further resources.

More on this resource here

Download the PDF here

Integrating the Prevention and the Management of the Health Complications into the curricula of nursing and midwifery

Integrating the Prevention and the Management of the Health Complications into the curricula of nursing and midwifery

Published by World Health Organisation (WHO)

This manual has been prepared for use by students in response to needs expressed in a proposal on female genital mutilation (FGM) in which nurses and midwives expressed the need to acquire knowledge and skills to prevent FGM, and to be able to manage girls and women with FGM complications.

The manual provides students with strategies for involving individuals, families, communities, and political leaders in the prevention of FGM. It prepares students to manage clients with FGM during pregnancy, childbirth, and the postpartum period, by providing a step by step guide to assessment, counselling, referral, and the opening of type III FGM.

This document is part of a set of training materials (Teacher’s Guide, student manual and policy guidelines) which have been prepared by the World Health Organization (WHO) to facilitate training for health personnel on female genital mutilation.

More on this resource here

Download the PDF here

Power, Rights & Participation: A practical guide for youth action in a post-2015 world.

Power, Rights & Participation: A practical guide for youth action in a post-2015 world.

Published by British Youth Council, Plan International, ActionAid and Restless Development

“Young people should be at the forefront of global change and innovation. Empowered, they can be key agents for development and peace. If, however, they are left on society’s margins, all of us will be impoverished. Let us ensure that all young people have every opportunity to participate fully in the lives of their societies.” Kofi Annan

This toolkit is set out in 7 separate modules:

1. Introduction

2. Know your Rights

3. The Post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals

4. Power and empowerment

5. Principles of governance

6. Policy and advocacy

7. Advocacy action planning

Each module is a self-contained unit made up of multiple sessions. Facilitators may select which modules to deliver, though it is suggested to do all sessions within the module and to deliver the modules in order. It is recommended that facilitators read through the modules considering the needs, experiences, and skill levels of participants so as to select the most appropriate content for their group.

More on this resource here

Download the PDF here

Safeguarding Girls from FGM: Teacher Trainer Guide

Safeguarding Girls from FGM: Teacher Trainer Guide

Published by 28 Too Many

This guide, developed by 28 Too Many, is aimed at teachers and helps them understand safeguarding of children in general, and from FGM in particular.

This workshop covers the following topics:

  • What is Safeguarding?

  • Safeguarding Legislation; The UNCRC and The African Charter

  • Safeguarding Issues in your community

  • The 4 P’s of Safeguarding

Download the PDF here

Training Manual on Gender and Female Genital Mutilation

Training Manual on Gender and Female Genital Mutilation

Published by UN Women

The Training Manual on Gender and Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting (FGM/C), developed by the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women), approaches Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting (FGM/C) from a gender perspective in order to increase participants’ understanding of FGM/C as a harmful practice and a form of violence against women and girls (VAWG).

More on this resource here

Download the PDF here

17 Ways to end FGM: Lessons from the field

17 Ways to end FGM: Lessons from the field

Published by the UNFPA-UNICEF Joint Programme to End FGM

17 Ways to End FGM/C uses a narrative approach to examine the challenges, complexities and achievements on the ground. It explores the innovative approaches that enable Joint Programme teams, local partners and advocates to deconstruct the social norms that allow FGM/C to continue in many communities.

The work of the Joint Programme is complicat- ed because FGM/C is not one practice—it is a tradition that carries different meanings for different communities, and sometimes multiple meanings within one community. The practice can range from a minor cut to a major excision followed by stitching of the vaginal opening. It may be carried out on infants before they know what is happening or on adolescent girls as a rite of passage and a preparation for marriage.

FGM/C may be ostensibly practised for reasons of hygiene or aesthetics, or out of a sense of religious, cultural or familial obligation. It may appear to enjoy widespread support, even while privately opposed by a significant proportion of the community. Or it may be carried out surreptitiously by a few. But what makes ending FGM/C so complex is that, in almost all contexts, parents genuinely want to do what is right for their child and family.

Like other forms of social change, the process of ending FGM/C often proceeds slowly at first, and then, as new tipping points are reached, all at once. The creative and strategic responses to the fluid situations encountered by Joint Programme teams and partners, and the lessons learned, form the subject of this volume. The many youth, women and men of all ages and from all walks of life—community and religious leaders, custodians of culture, youth ambassadors, griots, former excisors, health professionals, traditional healers, celebrities, policymakers and development experts—are its heroes.

Recognising and Preventing FGM. Free online safeguarding training

Recognising and Preventing FGM. Free online safeguarding training

Published by Virtual College

Throughout this free online safeguarding course, we follow Hope as she encounters the key issues relating to FGM and we see how they affect her throughout her life. The training will help a wide range of professionals to identify and assist girls who are at risk of FGM.

This course is useful for anyone who is interested in gaining an overview of FGM, particularly frontline staff in healthcare, police, border force and children’s social care.

Take the course online here

United to END FGM (UEFGM) e-learning course

United to END FGM (UEFGM) e-learning course

Published by UEFGM

The e-learning course consists of two Foundation Modules and 11 Specialised Modules.

  • Foundation Modules provide an introduction to understanding female genital mutilation (FGM) as a human-rights issue and a particular form of gender-based violence, including a deeper understanding of the gender and social dynamics involved.
  • Specialised Modules offer professionals the opportunity to expand their knowledge of FGM by selecting two further modules on a range of topics relevant to fields of expertise.
Each module combines a variety of material and exercises, including docudrama, case studies, additional reading and self-assessment quizzes, providing the learner with a wide and informed perspective from which to develop essential skills.
Course participants are expected to complete a short self-assessment quiz or interactive game at the end of each module, attaining at least eight correct answers before proceeding to the next module. The quiz may be taken up to three times. After completing all required modules and quizzes, the participant is requested to fill out a brief course evaluation. The participant will then receive an electronic certificate.