Blog


Blog posts from our network of grassroots activists and research academics

A research blog by Serene Chung which investigates the psychological effects of female genital mutilation (FGM) within migrant communities in the United Kingdom. Considering avaiable literature and interviews with experts, Serene analyses the psychological disorders suffered by the individual, considering their migrant cultural identity and also considers the psychological impact of FGM in the context of relationships between the women and their spouses or families.
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Over the past six months and despite undertaking demanding academic studies, a dedicated group of undergraduates at Oxford University formed a research panel and have undertaken extra work to study female genital mutilation (FGM). In this unique collaboration between the Oxford University branch of Lawyers Without Borders and 28 Too Many, students volunteered to join this project to educate themselves and others on the harm of FGM and how we can help end this practice.


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“FGM isn’t something that’s isolated to one place or one group of people. It’s a wider feminist issue, a human issue, which needs to be addressed collectively.”
-    Alice Denny


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London Mayoral candidate Sophie Walker from Women’s Equality Party recently launched her manifesto of changes the party is pledging to make if it is voted in. One of pledges made by the party is to work in partnership with specialist BME women’s services to ensure cultural related violence, such as female genital mutilation, will never happen in London. 


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A first-generation Nigerian filmmaker Solomon Onita Jr. in his most recent short film, Joy, explores the cultural clashes of a Nigerian family living in the United States. In the film, he tells the story of a woman who is trying to convince her husband not to circumcise their ten years old daughter, poetically named Joy. It tells the story of a women's struggle to protect her daughter from the harm of FGM whilst being true to her cultural heritage.


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In a recent The Guardian article, 28 Too Many’s researcher Gemma Locke suggests that ending female genital mutilation in Mali must be a Malian-led initiative. She said: “It has to be Malian to Malian, that has to be within the community, within the family, and beyond… ownership has to be with indigenous people, because if it’s not owned, it won’t keep. It’s not going to be sustainable.” 


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An update on recent news, events and progress in the global movement to end FGM by 28 Too Many volunteer Anna Sørensen. Former midwife Kubra Magennis and a mother of two from the Dawoodi Bohra community have each been sentenced to 15 months in prison. They were found guilty in November of carrying out female genital mutilation on the two daughters of the unnamed mother.


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The recent developments in the fight against FGM in The Gambia have been very encouraging. A guest blog by campaigner Andrew Mendy reflecting on progress in the fight against FGM in The Gambia and what further action is needed. 


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An update on some of this week's news and events in the campaign to end FGM by 28 Too Many volunteer Anna Sørensen. 

“When I learned the truth about the danger, lifelong health complications, the pain women go through having the practice done, and even death, I realised I couldn’t let this happen to another girl again.”
- Gift Augustine


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A special blog for International Women's Day 2016 from 28 Too Many volunteer Margaret Gati about FGM in Kenya and the progress towards ending it.
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