Blog


Blog posts from our network of grassroots activists and research academics

Guest Blog by the Society for the Improvement of Rural People (SIRP). In Igbo land, FGM is usually carried out to coincide with the child’s naming ceremony, which is a festive event with gifts and refreshments. In Igbo culture, the naming ceremony comes up almost immediately after the birth of the child. It is normally done on the 7th to the 12th day after the birth of the child. When a child is born in Igbo land, he or she is welcomed into the world with joyous songs.


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Guest Blog by the Pastoralist Child Foundation. Since 2013, Pastoralist Child Foundation’s (PCF) Alternative Rites of Passage (ARP) have been instrumental in lowering the rate of FGM in Samburu, Kenya. We have managed to decrease the former rate of 96% in East Samburu Ward down to 80%. Our replacement for “the cut” is through education and celebrations for groups of 60 girls during their school holidays in April, August, and December. 


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Guest Blog by Millicent Ondigo for Amref Health Africa. It began one and a half years ago with the birth of the ‘Yes I Do Alliance-Kenya Programme’. The Yes I Do Alliance had one purpose of contributing to the reduction of Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting (FGM/C), child marriage and teenage pregnancies among the Maa community residing in Kajiado West Sub County of Kajiado in Kenya.


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Guest Blog by Miranda Dobson, Orchid Project

SAFE Maa is a Kenyan-based NGO and UK charity working with the Maasai in the Loita Hills, South West Kenya, on ending female genital cutting (FGC), environmental sustainability, and addressing HIV and AIDS. They have been delivering programmes since 2008, and are dedicated to changing the attitudes surrounding FGC in Loita as a way to help create community-led change. Orchid Project partnered with SAFE Maa in 2013 to support an awareness-raising performance tour on FGC and have continued to work closely with them ever since.


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The Law and FGM in Nigeria

20 February 2018

Guest post by Barrister Ugwu Somtochukwu Nnamdi, Society for the Improvement of Rural People (SIRP). Did you know that currently in Nigeria, 20 million women and girls have been mutilated and yet there has been no conviction? Although, there are so many reasons for this, but in this article we dwelt on the two major reasons for this in Nigeria.


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Guest Blog by Kadi Doumbia. I have been trying to find out about a reason why girls have to undergo female genital mutilation, but unfortunately, I have not yet found any valid reasons to why we, girls must undergo this practice; perhaps there is no reason at all other than myths and ignorance.


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Guest Blog by Ayomikun Emmanuel Olugbode. The need for us to act as a nation against this practice cannot be overemphasized when practices or beliefs that can hamper the education of our girls are being done. One of the purposes of education is to enable the girl child to realize her rights and participate like her counterparts in the society. This practice of FGM/C in Nigeria has hindered many girls from achieving this purpose.


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Guest blog by Mama Sylla. For the 16 days of activism, I deem it necessary to describe this blog to be able to explain the reasons and the causes which push the parents to maim their daughters and at what price? The whole ceremony can be done during a month during the school holidays between July and September.


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Guest Blog by Dorian Cosijnse. Uganda is one of the 28+ countries where Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) is practised. As stipulated on this website, the estimated prevalence lingers around 1.4% amongst women in the age of 15 till 49. Although this national figure is relatively low, prevalence amongst the Pokot tribe in the Eastern part of the country is near-universal (95%) ¹. This guest blog is written in Amudat, a district in the Karamoja region, and aims to give an insight in the harmful cultural practice of FGM amongst this unique tribe in East-Uganda.


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The girls in GESL decided to take on a national issue relevant to the needs of girls, that they wanted to raise awareness on. The girls decided to focus on educating their peers on the negative impacts of FGM through an advocacy media campaign. This blog showcases pieces by two of the girls in GESL,  Finda Karimu and Fatamta Bah. The GESL girls are raising awareness via social media and other platforms on their project titled “FGM E do So” (FGM Enough!). We hope you are inspired by Finda and Fatmata’s reflection.


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