2018


Blog posts from our network of grassroots activists and research academics

Guest Blog by Mama Sylla, FGM survivor and Chairwoman of la Fraternite Guineenne: I grew up in a society where I had been led to believe that FGM/C was normal and justified.  In Guinea the practice of FGM is still widespread and the belief is that a girl has to undergo FGM in order to be accepted later as an accomplished woman.


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Guest Blog by Hope Gloria Mugambi Mwanyuma, Founder: Hope Alive Africa Initiative: A safe space for girls is a place where women and girls can go to at any time to feel safer and empowered and have access to information, education, recreational activities, support and services.


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Guest Blog by Mohammed Gaber: FGM in Yemen is distributed throughout the country but predominates in four main cities; Aden, Al-Hodiedah, Al-Mhrah, and Hadramout. In 2001, the Yemeni Ministry of Public Health and Population (YMoPHP) enacted a decree to ban public and private health facilities from performing FGM. However, some facilities still carry out the practice.


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Guest Blog from Richard A. Powell, Mohamed Yussuf, and Bettina Shell-Duncan, Population Council “Evidence to End FGM/C” For decades female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) has been debated in dozens of countries around the world. But it is in Somaliland, in the Horn of Africa, where a recent fatwa, or religious edict, has rekindled a passionate debate of ‘zero tolerance’ versus ‘acceptable harm minimization’


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Guest Blog from Bakary Seedy Dampha, Founder and National Coordinator, Kids Come First, The Gambia. The Girl Generation organized the first ever Pan African youth summit held from 25-26 April 2018 in Nairobi, Kenya. The summit brought together 170 young people from 17 countries including diaspora in the UK.


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Guest Blog by Abdullahi Mohamed Abdinur, Health and Hunger Aid. Health and Hunger Aid (HhAid) is a non-governmental organization, free from political, clans, religion and ethnic divisions, works with thousands of youth in urban and rural areas throughout Northern Kenya. HhAid strives to create a future where communities are able to facilitate their own development. HhAid works in program areas of Sexual and Reproductive and right, Food security, Water and Sanitation as well as HIV/AIDS awareness/mitigation.


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Guest Blog by Sam Cook, Feed the Minds. Alternative Rite of Passage (ARP) approaches – that use an alternative ritual to FGM to symbolise a girl’s transition to womanhood – sound great on the surface. But are they an effective strategy for abandonment of FGM that can be applied in other communities? And who else needs to be involved to ensure long term change?


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Guest Blog by the Society for the Improvement of Rural People (SIRP). In Igbo land, FGM is usually carried out to coincide with the child’s naming ceremony, which is a festive event with gifts and refreshments. In Igbo culture, the naming ceremony comes up almost immediately after the birth of the child. It is normally done on the 7th to the 12th day after the birth of the child. When a child is born in Igbo land, he or she is welcomed into the world with joyous songs.


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Guest Blog by the Pastoralist Child Foundation. Since 2013, Pastoralist Child Foundation’s (PCF) Alternative Rites of Passage (ARP) have been instrumental in lowering the rate of FGM in Samburu, Kenya. We have managed to decrease the former rate of 96% in East Samburu Ward down to 80%. Our replacement for “the cut” is through education and celebrations for groups of 60 girls during their school holidays in April, August, and December. 


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Guest Blog by Millicent Ondigo for Amref Health Africa. It began one and a half years ago with the birth of the ‘Yes I Do Alliance-Kenya Programme’. The Yes I Do Alliance had one purpose of contributing to the reduction of Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting (FGM/C), child marriage and teenage pregnancies among the Maa community residing in Kajiado West Sub County of Kajiado in Kenya.


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